Lewis and Susan Jenkins



Diary of a Robot

A Literary historical science fiction mystery

            Table of Chapters

Chapter 0. Problems
Chapter 1. Headaches

Chapter 2. Happy Holidays
Chapter 3. Mr. Nice Guy
Chapter 4. The Brainless One
Chapter 5. A Little Crazy
Chapter 6. Grave Consequences
Chapter 7. Core Directives
Chapter 8. Expect Difficulties
Chapter 9. Caveats  ------------------------------------>
Chapter 10. Mister Machine
Chapter 11. Good News, Bad News, El Cheapo
Chapter 12. New Memories
Chapter 13. Little Problems
Chapter 14. Lasers, Language, and Happiness
Chapter 15. Chatterbots
Chapter 16. Ready Or Not
Chapter 17. Not a Turing Test
Chapter 18. Reality Test
Chapter 19. Chess, Anyone?
Chapter 20. FOM
Chapter 21. Chairman of the Board
Chapter 22. The Usual Suspects
Chapter 23. M. God
Chapter 24. Walkabout
Chapter 25. Why
Chapter 26. First Blood
Chapter 27. More Machines?
Chapter 28. POV
Chapter 29. ROI
Chapter 30. Last Blood
Chapter 31. Don’t Want to Talk About It
Chapter 32. Round Table
Chapter 33. A Change of Mind
Chapter 34. Threes
Chapter 35. Knight Moves
Chapter 36. Little Combinations
Chapter 37. Can We Talk?
Chapter 38. Pas de Deux
Chapter 39. The Jig Is Up
Chapter 40. Good, Bad, Ugly                     Chapter 41. Function Goes On

                                                       Day 0.00.00

      My diary really begins here. Previous chapters recall the pregnancy as told to me much later.
     My year/month/day timeline tops each page (Day Y.MM.DD).
     Blank lines mean a short time, or change of location or POV.
     Dot lines show passing time. More dots mean more time: One is less than a day; four is a month or more.

     This book contains the facts as we were able to dig them out, and may not be entirely accurate if we’ve been told lies. That is the risk you take to trust people. And some parts are necessarily hearsay.
     Hearsay is not admissible in a court of law. But if you trust people to accurately say what they heard, it is reasonable to save time by not verifying every little thing unless it is crucial—or outrageous. If the thing is wrong, it is probably a joke or an honest—perhaps a careless—mistake. I have been burned for that attitude, although the total time saved was worth the burns.
     We still use third-person narration, which allows us to interweave Doc’s safe house recall into a consistent timeline with my Data Matrix and other points of view. I do not apologize for this construction, although it distresses me to call this my diary when it should be called my memoir but it reads like a novel. You would not enjoy my diary in its original form. Trust me.


Here is this chapter as it was before my Flesch Readability changes:

My diary really begins here. You could consider previous chapters as a recall of the pregnancy told to me much later.

My year/month/day timeline tops each page (Day Y.MM.DD). Blank lines mean a short time, or change of location. Dot lines show passing time. More dots mean more time: One is less than a day; four is a month or more.

This book contains the facts as we were able to dig them out, and may not be entirely accurate if we’ve been told lies. That is the risk you take to trust people. And some parts are necessarily hearsay.

Hearsay may not be admissible in a court of law, but if you trust hearers to accurately say what they heard, then it seems reasonable to save time by not verifying every little thing they say unless it is crucial—or outrageous, and then if it is wrong it is probably a joke or an honest mistake. Of course, I have been burned for that attitude, although the total time saved was easily worth the few burns. And anyway: When people remember things, their memories are limited by their perspective, and are colored and shaped by their past, their appetites, and the perceived pressures of society around them. So, scientifically, human remembrance is incomplete and inaccurate to varying degrees even when the humans themselves are trustworthy.

We still use third-person narration, which allows us to interweave Doc’s safe house recall in a consistent timeline with my Data Matrix and other points of view. I do not apologize for this construction, although it distresses me to call this my diary when it should be called my memoir but it reads like a novel. You would not like to read my diary in its original form. Trust me.

Some early reviewers wondered who the narrator was and complained that the narrator reads minds. I assure you that although I have a human helping me, I am the narrator, and I cannot read the human mind. Reading my own is difficult enough. If my third person narration seems to have read a few minds, it is either because their attached faces have said things to us, or because surveillance bugs picked them up.

Finally, I have no crystal ball interface either. If it seems at times like I can see into the future, it is only because we are trying to put the past onto paper in an accurate, entertaining and informative way.